Tuesday, September 01, 2015

Black-eyed Susans

It is the first time we have these growing in our yard, and some came inside today. The vase Number One made for me in High School Freshman Art was the best vessel for these beautiful flowers!



Monday, August 31, 2015

A plethora of flowers for the Blessed Virgin

It has been a while since I posted here my weekly gathering of flowers for the Blessed Mother! They have come from friends' yards and with strangers' yards alike, from Catholic friends and non-Catholics too, from the store, or from an occasional bouquet given to me... Of all of the services I have volunteered to do in life, this one may be the one of the ones I most enjoy! Whenever I see more people coming to her statue and lighting candles and praying at church, I like to believe the fresh flowers are part of it. Salve Regina! 

Blessed Virgin,
to whom I am so very thankful,
who protected me, 
guided me,
inspired me to be a a saint since childhood,
these flowers are for you!
May you remain always close to my heart,
all my days, pointing me to Christ your Divine Son,
in Whom my heart will finally rest one day.
Amen







Saturday, August 29, 2015

Fruits and flowers

The sunflowers have opened right outside my kitchen window... we had a little bit of sunshine yesterday morning before the sky got rain-covered again, and I was able to take some photos. I also brought two tomatoes in from the garden--we ate  them for lunch with cheese--and then in the evening a friend game me a bouquet from her late-summer garden... I found it so beautiful! Thanking God, Lord of Beauty, for these gifts.











Friday, August 28, 2015

... And four more.

How could I not post here the sweetest post by Number Five?


Or the cutest cow Number Seven did for friend Maristela at the church picnic?


Or the wonderful musical evening we had this week when the Diocesan Music Director and his family, homeschool friends, came over for dinner?


And lastly this super cool story my friend Caitilin posted on Facebook? 


Here's the story: (I couldn't find a link)

Do you know who this is a photo of? Chances are you don’t, but don’t feel bad because probably not one American in one million does, and that is a National tragedy. His name is Eugene Jacques Bullard, and he is the first African-American fighter pilot in history. But he is also much more then that: He’s also a national hero, and his story is so incredible that I bet if you wrote a movie script based on it Hollywood would reject it as being too far-fetched.

Bullard was an expat living in France, and when World War 1 broke out he joined the French Infantry. He was seriously wounded, and France awarded him the Croix de Guerre and Medaille Militaire. In 1916 he joined the French air service and he first trained as a gunner but later he trained as a pilot. When American pilots volunteered to help France and formed the famous Lafayette Escadrille, he asked to join but by the time he became a qualified pilot they were no longer accepting new recruits, so he joined the Lafayette Flying Corps instead. He served with French flying units and he completed 20 combat missions.

When the United States finally joined the war, Bullard was the only member of the Escadrille or the French Flying Corps who was NOT invited to join the US Air Service. The reason? At that time the Air Service only accepted white men.

Now here is the part that almost sounds like a sequel to ‘Casablanca’: After WWI Bullard became a jazz musician in Paris and he eventually owned a nightclub called ‘L’Escadrille’. When the Germans invaded France and conquered it in WW2, his Club, and Bullard, became hugely popular with German officers, but what they DIDN’T know was that Bullard, who spoke fluent German, was actually working for the Free French as a spy. He eventually joined a French infantry unit, but he was badly wounded and had to leave the service.

By the end of the war, Bullard had become a national hero in France, but he later moved back to the U.S. where he was of course completely unknown. Practically no one in the United States was aware of it when, in 1959, the French government named him a national Chevalier, or Knight.

In 1960, the President of France, Charles DeGaulle, paid a state visit to the United States and when he arrived he said that one of the first things he wanted to do was to meet Bullard. That sent the White House staff scrambling because most of them, of course, had never even heard of him. They finally located him in New York City, and DeGaulle traveled there to meet him personally. At the time, Eugene Bullard was working as … An elevator operator.

Not long after Eugene Bullard met with the President of France, he passed away, and today very, very few Americans, and especially African-Americans, even know who he is. But, now YOU do, don’t you? And I hope you’ll be able to find opportunities to tell other people about this great American hero that probably only 1 American in 1 Million has ever heard of.

Bullard was an expat living in France, and when World War 1 broke out he joined the French Infantry. He was seriously wounded, and France awarded him the Croix de Guerre and Medaille Militaire. In 1916 he joined the French air service and he first trained as a gunner but later he trained as a pilot. When American pilots volunteered to help France and formed the famous Lafayette Escadrille, he asked to join but by the time he became a qualified pilot they were no longer accepting new recruits, so he joined the Lafayette Flying Corps instead. He served with French flying units and he completed 20 combat missions.
When the United States finally joined the war, Bullard was the only member of the Escadrille or the French Flying Corps who was NOT invited to join the US Air Service. The reason? At that time the Air Service only accepted white men.
Now here is the part that almost sounds like a sequel to ‘Casablanca’: After WWI Bullard became a jazz musician in Paris and he eventually owned a nightclub called ‘L’Escadrille’. When the Germans invaded France and conquered it in WW2, his Club, and Bullard, became hugely popular with German officers, but what they DIDN’T know was that Bullard, who spoke fluent German, was actually working for the Free French as a spy. He eventually joined a French infantry unit, but he was badly wounded and had to leave the service.
By the end of the war, Bullard had become a national hero in France, but he later moved back to the U.S. where he was of course completely unknown. Practically no one in the United States was aware of it when, in 1959, the French government named him a national Chevalier, or Knight.
In 1960, the President of France, Charles DeGaulle, paid a state visit to the United States and when he arrived he said that one of the first things he wanted to do was to meet Bullard. That sent the White House staff scrambling because most of them, of course, had never even heard of him. They finally located him in New York City, and DeGaulle traveled there to meet him personally. At the time, Eugene Bullard was working as … An elevator operator.
Not long after Eugene Bullard met with the President of France, he passed away, and today very, very few Americans, and especially African-Americans, even know who he is. But, now YOU do, don’t you? And I hope you’ll be able to find opportunities to tell other people about this great American hero that probably only 1 American in 1 Million has ever heard of.

Thursday, August 27, 2015

A couple more...

Number Seven and Number Six are part time students at the local high school. While Number Six goes daily for one period--Concert Choir, Number Seven has so many classes she wants to take this semester that she spends all day there. We are still doing a couple of subjects at home. They are both very happy. Number Six loves the choir repertoire for his semester: a Lamentations of Jeremiah in Latin, an 8-part Shenandoah arrangement and a beautiful Handel. Number Six has choir, band, art, Algebra and German, plus Honor Bio and Honors English which are her favorite classes.